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Feature Of The Day

(20170629) Today, the research team celebrated the departure of two significant graduates, Silvia Lopez and Aaron Gross, over lunch. Prior to lunch, Silvia gave an outstanding presentation on her thesis proposal, found here.

(20170621) The Research Team has submitted their paper in the NIPS2017 conference, titled "Deep Architectures for Automated Seizure Detection in Scalp EEGs."

Institute for Signal and Information Processing
Joseph Picone
on July 12, 2017 09:17
DARPA has recently make significant investments in this area:

https://techcrunch.com/2017/07/10/darpa-nesd-grants-paradromics/

http://spectrum.ieee.org/the-human-os/biomedical/devices/darpa-wants-brain-implants-that-record-from-1-million-neurons

https://www.forbes.com/sites/zarastone/2017/07/10/darpa-announces-investment-in-a-brain-implant-startup-that-wants-to-be-a-modem-for-the-mind/#4972817279d9

including a project that hopes to provide a brain to speech interface that sounds very interesting (and challenging).

It is interesting they would invest $18M in a startup. That is a pretty serious investment, even for DARPA.

-Joe

Joseph Picone
on July 2, 2017 18:59
I continue to be impressed with how easily you can do some things in Python. I like dictionaries

I have a dictionary that contains:

{a: 1, bb: 9, ccc: 27, dddd: 35, ee: 47}

I want to find the string length of the maximum length key. I could write a loop, check the len of each string and save the maximum.

But here is a really nifty one-liner:

print "length of longest key = ", max(map(len, mydict))

Pretty impressive.

-Joe

Joseph Picone
on June 29, 2017 10:44
Silvia successfully defended her thesis today. Silvia has worked very hard during her time in our lab and was very deserving of this achievement. The presentation she gave today was excellent.

Congratulations to Silvia!

-Joe

P.S. Her thesis materials are at:



Joseph Picone
on June 26, 2017 16:38
For our new students:

Very often, someone refers you to a command, such as nedc_htk_rescore. You want to look at the script, but you really don't know where it is. But it is in your path.

You can do this:

nedc_000_[1]: which nedc_htk_rescore
/data/isip/tools/haswell/nfc/bin/nedc_htk_rescore

Even better, you can combine this with more:

nedc_000_[1]: more `which nedc_htk_rescore`

In our software, we always put the source filename at the top of the file, so this shows:

#!/bin/sh

# file: $(NEDC_NFC)/util/shell/nedc_htk_rescore/nedc_htk_rescore.sh
#

and now you can find the actual location of the source code.

This is one simple way you can quickly come up to speed on a programming environment.

-Joe

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